We weave 3 types of scarves, all with different hand-feel and weight.
Select a style below to find a scarf you'll love...
Khullu Scarf.
Khullu Scarf.

Khullu Scarf.

$175.00
6 in Stock
Breathable, cozy, and thin. Forget the heavy hanging bunch-up next time you need a little extra warmth.

Orders fulfilled by May 15, 2020...
We're putting on the finishing touches.

Weight

Featherweight.

Hand Feel

Woolly soft.

Warmth

Brisk day scarf.

Hand Feel

Woolly soft.

Warmth

Brisk day scarf.

  • Read more about our materials here.
  • Free shipping and returns.
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Cashmere Scarf.
Cashmere Scarf.

Cashmere Scarf.

$175.00
3 in Stock
We weave with the world's finest cashmere. Grade A cashmere is 14-16μm in fineness. Ours is even finer at 13μm.

Orders fulfilled by May 15, 2020...
We're putting on the finishing touches.

Weight

Featherweight.

Hand Feel

Heavenly Soft

Warmth

Chilly day scarf.

Hand Feel

Heavenly soft.

Warmth

Chilly day scarf.

  • Read more about our materials here.
  • Free shipping and returns.
  • Join our Customer Advisory Board? Apply here.
Zero Gravity Scarf.
Zero Gravity Scarf.

Zero Gravity Scarf.

$175.00
Sold Out
We call this the "Zero Gravity" scarf because lightweight is an understatement.

Orders fulfilled by May 15, 2020...
We're putting on the finishing touches.

Weight

Less than a dime.

Hand Feel

Silky. Not woolly.

Warmth

Sunny day scarf

Hand Feel

Silky. Not woolly.

Warmth

Sunny day scarf.

  • Read more about our materials here.
  • Free shipping and returns.
  • Join our Customer Advisory Board? Apply here.
Heavyweight Scarf.
Heavyweight Scarf.

Heavyweight Scarf.

$130.00
Made from the same yarn as our blankets so you can stay cozy no matter how cold it gets.

Orders fulfilled by May 15, 2020...
We're putting on the finishing touches.

Weight

Blanket weight.

Hand Feel

Very soft.

Warmth

Cozy day scarf.

Hand Feel

Very soft.

Warmth

Cozy day scarf.

  • Read more about our materials here.
  • Free shipping and returns.
  • Join our Customer Advisory Board? Apply here.

In order to create sweaters you'll love, we knew that we needed to take our learning beyond what we could find online... naturally, we learned to hand-weave.

How Weaving Helped Start Our Business.

Read Story

Watch us hand-weave featuring Johnny Cash music.

Watch Us Weave

Stay up to date with our progress.

Step 1, Wind The Warp

It all starts with a warping mill. We position pegs in place so our fabrics are 15 feet long. Then we wind by taking our fine 50% khullu, 50% silk yarn and wrap it up and down the mill 600 times.

Step 2, Dress The Loom 

Some are surprised to learn that preparing to weave is nearly 90% of the journey. We were too! But it makes sense when you think about the time and precision needed to sort through, and evenly tension 600 strands of impressively fine yarn.

Step 3, Spread The Warp

At this point, each strand of yarn is organized into groups of 16 per inch. To ensure that the fragile strands don't break when put under high tension, we sort through each group 1 strand at a time and untangle, which tends to be quite a few.

Step 4, Thread The Heddles

Now that all 600 strands are organized, we take a small tool called a heddle hook and thread each strand through a metal opening. This step is like threading a needle. Heddles can be threaded in many different ways depending on the weaving pattern. Because we love the look and feel of twill and balanced weaves, we thread from back to front in a 1, 2, 3, 4 pattern.

Step 5, Thread The Reed 

In this step we take each of the 600 strands and thread them through the reed. The reed sits across the loom on a frame called a beater and is used to push the yarn woven horizontally, AKA weft, into the warp. The reed can be interchanged with a spectrum of gauges, which sets the number of warp stands per inch. We use a 16 gauge reed, which gives us amazingly lightweight, thin summer scarves.

Step 6, Tie-On And Weave 

After the 600 strands of yarn are sorted, organized, threaded, and given equal tension, we finally weave. The weaving motion works like this: with one hand we grip the boat, and in a fluid motion we fling the boat across the warp. Depending which foot peddles we press, we can create many different types of patterns.

Step 7, Cut And Bloom

This final step, which is one of the most important, is to bloom the fabric with a cold water wash. Blooming allows the woven yarn to become fuller looking and softer. We always joke that it's a mystery as to how a fabric will turn out until we go through the blooming process. The means we can work on a fabric for days just to realize it doesn't meet our high standards. But what can we say, we live for the thrill!